September 30, 2013

sourcedumal:

Don’t trust anyone who indignantly questions the want of more well rounded  poc representation in media

(via geekbap)

February 28, 2013
"The more we seed cross-cultural books and other media in our homes, the more kids will see it as “normal” when they leave home and see people different from themselves at school, at the grocery store, at daycare—that everyone, no matter their ethnicity, is the hero in his or her own story. This applies no matter what our family’s ethnicity—though kids of color are already getting white culture through the media they consume, particularly TV, where so few people of color are stars in their own stories. If they appear, they’re usually best friends, sidekicks, villains, etc. And as we all know, according to Hollywood, the Black Dude Dies First and Vasquez Always Dies. We have so many—so, so, so many—books that cover slavery and the Civil War and the Civil Rights movement, but we don’t have nearly enough books that feature the everyday lives of minority kids, or the little-known heroes of color of other eras and countries."

— Stacy Whitman, editorial director of Tu Books, on “Diversifying our family’s reading: children’s and young adult books” (via diversityinya)

(via aka14kgold)

October 5, 2011
cocothinkshefancy:

ramou:

gq:

Lunch With Omar In Our Cafeteria

Writers will see your work and want to try you in different things but I think you have to stay true to your vehicle. We all have a vehicle. Whether it’s a thug, or a school child or the babyface or the sex siren or the video vixen, whatever it is ride that until the wheels fall off and eventually, if you build your foundation then you can branch off. I use De Niro as an example. At the beginning of his career when he was doing those thugged-out movies—The Godfather Part II, then Goodfellas and Casino—I guarantee you he wasn’t thinking about doing no Meet the Fockers. 
Sweet Moses.

cocothinkshefancy:

ramou:

gq:

Lunch With Omar In Our Cafeteria

Writers will see your work and want to try you in different things but I think you have to stay true to your vehicle. We all have a vehicle. Whether it’s a thug, or a school child or the babyface or the sex siren or the video vixen, whatever it is ride that until the wheels fall off and eventually, if you build your foundation then you can branch off. I use De Niro as an example. At the beginning of his career when he was doing those thugged-out movies—The Godfather Part II, then Goodfellas and Casino—I guarantee you he wasn’t thinking about doing no Meet the Fockers.

Sweet Moses.

August 9, 2011
“That’s What She Said” is Queer Asian America In Your Face [Whit/AutoStraddle]

What if you find that people like you are missing from TV and film? What if you realize that even queer progressive shows are limited in their portrayal of people who look like you? What if you feel like the world is missing representation of people that you identify with?

Well then. You go out and make it yourself.

That’s What She Said is a Los Angeles-based web series completely filmed, edited, written and acted by an Asian/American cast and crew. Currently finished with its first season and gearing up for a second, the show is produced by Pearl Girls Productions, a team of queer and straight individuals living in California — Anni Gee, Narinda Heng, N. Ki, Claire Kim, Vicky Luu and Allison Santos. The storylines in TWSS star straight, queer and gender non-normative characters, and the scripts revolve around the sugar-sweet formula that made The L Word such a success: a cast of five main characters getting together, breaking up and hooking up.

August 8, 2011

They’ve arrived, haven’t they, (East) Asian American adoptees? Yay.  

H/t to Japanistic Blog:

What does that mean? Well, so many things. But when we are watching tv? One seriously important thing is that it is extremely rare that we find ourselves reflected in ANY mainstream media. Not on tv, not in magazines, unless it’s the constant stories about Angelina and Brad, not in movies. The list goes on.

Last night, I sat and watched less than a minute of a family like ours. A boy, his parents, goofiness, home from college visits, and nothing in the commercial was about how that family came to be. It wasn’t about their adoption journey or being a multiracial family. It was about a family. A Mom and Dad hugging their kid when he came home from school.

It was about being a family, and for that 30 seconds, that was all that mattered. 

The more ordinary we are, the more my family will be able to find books and television shows about all kinds of families. And hopefully, the more people will understand that families like ours ARE ordinary, as are families with same sex parents, or single parents, or parents or children who are alternately abled.

January 23, 2011
Black Models Celebrated - from NPR

(via thefirthblackbirdisflying-deact)

January 21, 2011
How To Sell Honour Killings

jaded16india:

ithasakicktoit:

“If there is one thing that irritates me more than self-righteous domestic abuse, it is the reasoning of “family honor.” The article utilizes the term as a buzzword, but does not really make any attempt to unpack what this term might mean, thus inviting the reader to homogenize Muslims. […] A number of reasons might culminate in someone being abused by her family. Violence against women is something that occurs in a number of places, in attachment to a wide range of cultural and religious values. Violence does not discriminate. What scares me about seeing phrases like “family honor” and other terms combining Islam with a certain sense of tribal element is that it makes it seem as though domestic violence is the problem of a certain uncivilized force, which just pushes the real issues into invisibility. The real issue at hand is power. There are a myriad of ways in difference countries and cultures that women are kept powerless—economically, institutionally, religiously—through societal structures. It becomes very easy to simply mutter, “those crazy Muslims” when reading an article such as that covering Azad’s sad story. But violence against women is a problem that belongs to all of us. Something that we all have a responsibility to fight, despite different religions or cultures.”

A Family Affair: Afshan Azad’s Assault » Muslimah Media Watch (via first-taste)

There is a pattern involved in Selling Honour Killings. 

  • Phust, make sure the cases reported are of only ‘extreme’ religions like Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism Not Christians. Of course Christians are NEVER fundamentalists. For if they do the same things as we do then they’ll turn dusty too, no? 
  • Then, make sure any views supporting the person who got killed is sidelined and only present the most violent views. Maybe you can also have mass-slaughter of animals in the background, because that means they are clearly barbaric, no?*
  • Show pictures of NICE IMPERIAL PERSON who is horrified at such orthodox values and show close up of a hued-screaming person, this way you convey human pain and pity in about 20 seconds alone.
  • Fail to mention the socially orchestrated Lajja or shame in these communities, make it seem like they kill people for entertainment. Some message from Palin can even fit in here.
  • Stay as far as possible into intoning that colonialism, neo-imperialism, capitalism are children of the First World and these conditions are perpetuated because of that pesky-colonialism-thing. Instead behave the Third World is a devil of its own doing.
  • And if this is a live telecast, RUN! Because brown buggers hack people up for fun, as you very well know and report. 

Voilà, honour killings ready for consumption. And for more on honour killings, see this

————

*Make sure to not include Turkeys. Otherwise you’ll do the reverse-USA before you can say OOPS. 

(via oncejadedtwicesnarked-deactivat)

January 21, 2011
Oi With The Poodles Already: How To Sell Honour Killings

ithasakicktoit:

“If there is one thing that irritates me more than self-righteous domestic abuse, it is the reasoning of “family honor.” The article utilizes the term as a buzzword, but does not really make any attempt to unpack what this term might mean, thus inviting the reader to…

(Source: muslimahmediawatch.org, via oncejadedtwicesnarked-deactivat)

January 20, 2011
Sur-reality TV

redlightpolitics:

“If we’re watching ‘Flavor of Love,’ and we’re watching people of color being treated in a way where the men are alternately fools and buffoons or violent thugs, pimps and criminals, and the women are being treated as ignorant, hypersexual, crazy, illiterate bitches, whores and ghetto sluts — all terms used on those shows — and we think it’s funny, there are sociological and socio-political reasons why that comes off as funny to people and that does have to do with deep-seated social beliefs about race in America.”

Author Jennifer L. Pozner on The Troubling Truth About Reality TV

Also, check Pozner’s YouTube Channel, “Reality Rehab”, described by Ms Magazine Blog as

[…]a media literacy project that borrows you-can’t-make-this-stuff-up dialogue and scenes from reality TV shows (“I would be a servant to you”). In each webisode, “Dr. Jenn” helps one of reality TV’s most persistent stock characters (“The Slutty Bitch,” “The Angry Black Woman,” “The Top Model,” “The Real Housewife”) break out of his or her stereotype. After completing a stint in Reality Rehab, which combines “media literacy therapy” with “confessional cam” monologues,the characters emerge fully-dimensional human beings once more.

I’ve consumed a lot of reality TV shows and similar to eating McDonald’s I knew it was bad for me despite of or because it was oh so tasty.  I’m done with this stuff.  I’ve always watched with a critical eye though, did not get swept up in the glamor or sordidness of it.

The ensemble shows are the problematic ones. It was a glimpse into lives that were foreign, but I knew what I was seeing was sur-real.  ”The Sur-real Life” on Vh-1 was probably the only accurate inaccurate show of this sort because they understood the joke of the premise.  Its ugly spawn, “Strange Love” and “Flavor of Love” were monstrous, like the cyclops children of Saturn and Ops/Rhea.  They should have been left in the dark underworld and not been revealed to the light of day or primetime television.  And that’s why I can’t get behind the show, “K Town” which is shopping for a network deal.  

Yes there have been exceptions, remarkable shows that were mentioned in the article.  These shows will not go away for now.  People are still hungry for them.  It’s all in line with our internet and youtube world.  Go ahead and consume, but be careful and know what you are ingesting.  Eat your burgers and fries but also know there are also carrot sticks and apples at McDonald’s.

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