June 9, 2011
"A search for truth brings justice to WWII Japanese American internees" [LA Times]

Government lawyers had argued that the U.S. rounded up all Japanese Americans on the West Coast because there wasn’t time to determine who was loyal and who was not.

But the document Herzig-Yoshinaga found, an early draft of a report by Lieut. Gen. John L. DeWitt to his Army superiors, said that time had not been the issue. DeWitt wrote that internments were necessary because Japanese cultural traits prevented officials from distinguishing between loyal and disloyal Japanese Americans — "it was impossible to separate the sheep from the goats."

Herzig-Yoshinaga’s discovery played an important role in the commission’s conclusion that internment was a product of “race prejudice, war hysteria and the failure of political leadership.”

The findings led to an official government apology and reparations of $20,000 per survivor.

May 19, 2011
Manzanar Beauties

ofanotherfashion:

Florence Yamaguchi (left), and Kinu Hirashima, both from Los Angeles, are pictured as they stand under an apple tree at Manzanar internment camp. (Their hairdos are amazing - especially Hirashima’s bangs!)

Credit: National Archives Registry

March 16, 2011
fuckyeahapihistory:

Mary Kitano from Manzanar and her fellow-workers on the staff of the City News Service, 1945.
Mary Kitano just received a $25 check from Readers Digest for a picturesque patter item, and also has a commission to write for Now magazine. City News Service has 15 reporters, covering metropolitan Los Angeles for nearby small-city papers. Photographer: Mace, Charles E. Los Angeles, California. 5/14/45

A 2007 interview with Mary Kitano and her husband, Doug Diltz, plus more photos.
PIONEERING ASIAN-AMERICAN JOURNALIST MARY KITANO left a life of incarceration and displacement at Manzanar “Relocation Camp” in World War II to return to Los Angeles, where she worked for City News Service, the Daily News, and eventually KNX Newsradio. She and her husband, veteran L.A. wire service journalist Doug Diltz, met when Mary worked in the Daily News libary, and Doug worked for United Press, which was just down the hall in the old Daily News building at Pico and Los Angeles Streets.

fuckyeahapihistory:

Mary Kitano from Manzanar and her fellow-workers on the staff of the City News Service, 1945.

Mary Kitano just received a $25 check from Readers Digest for a picturesque patter item, and also has a commission to write for Now magazine. City News Service has 15 reporters, covering metropolitan Los Angeles for nearby small-city papers. Photographer: Mace, Charles E. Los Angeles, California. 5/14/45

A 2007 interview with Mary Kitano and her husband, Doug Diltz, plus more photos.

PIONEERING ASIAN-AMERICAN JOURNALIST MARY KITANO left a life of incarceration and displacement at Manzanar “Relocation Camp” in World War II to return to Los Angeles, where she worked for City News Service, the Daily News, and eventually KNX Newsradio. She and her husband, veteran L.A. wire service journalist Doug Diltz, met when Mary worked in the Daily News libary, and Doug worked for United Press, which was just down the hall in the old Daily News building at Pico and Los Angeles Streets.

February 17, 2011

ofanotherfashion:

A portrait of the beautiful Fumiko Hirata taken in 1943 by Ansel Adams.

From the Library of Congress.

I’ve noticed how there are “beauty portraits” (my term) among the Manzanar photos by Adams.  Was it a subversive message or just an appreciation of female beauty by Adams? Both?

  Nurse Aiko Hamaguchi

February 14, 2011
curate:

3rdofmay:
The art: Ansel Adams, Tom Kobayashi, Landscape (looking at camera), 1943.
The news: “Muslims to be Congressional Hearings’ Main Focus,” by Laurie Goodstein in the New York Times. 
The source: Collection of the Library of Congress. For more information on Adams’ pictures of Manzanar, see the LOC’s “Ansel Adams’s Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar.”

curate:

3rdofmay:

The art: Ansel Adams, Tom Kobayashi, Landscape (looking at camera), 1943.

The news: “Muslims to be Congressional Hearings’ Main Focus,” by Laurie Goodstein in the New York Times. 

The source: Collection of the Library of Congress. For more information on Adams’ pictures of Manzanar, see the LOC’s “Ansel Adams’s Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar.”

February 9, 2011
Of Another Fashion: These three Japanese American women are just arriving to Lone Pine,...

ofanotherfashion:

These three Japanese American women are just arriving to Lone Pine, California (May 1942, photographer unknown). They’re walking to a bus that will take them to Manzanar internment camp. There is so much to love about this photograph: the saddle shoes and socks combination, the headscarf, the…

(via waittheresmore)

February 6, 2011
curate:

“You can  still be feminine and have balls.” – Tura Satana 
She was born in Hokkaidō, Japan in 1935 to a silent movie actor and a  contortionist who performed with the circus. She’s of Japanese,  Filipino, Scotch-Irish, and American Indian heritage. Her family spent  time at the Manzanar Relocation Camp in Southern California before they were relocated to Chicago during  World War II. Satana grew up on the Westside, in what she calls “The Mafia  Section of town.”
Hers was the only Asian family in the neighborhood. As a result, she  suffered daily harassment from other schoolchildren that forced her to  continually have to fight her way to and from school. She also blossomed  early – by age nine she was wearing a size 34C bra – a matter that made  grade school life even worse.
At the age of nine, Satana was assaulted and raped by five men. They  were caught and arrested, but never prosecuted. It was  rumored that the judge had been paid off with a $1,000 bribe. She  was sent off to reform school for “enticing” them – the victim had been  blamed.
Her father taught her self-defense and she went on to earn a green  belt in aikido and a black belt in karate. In Jimmy  McDonough’s Big  Bosoms and Square Jaws: The Biography of Russ Meyer, King of the Sex  Film, Satana says, “If I could help every woman this has  happened to, I would. It is in your spirit to conquer this degradation.”
Satana made a vow to herself that she would get even with each and  every one of her attackers. Over the course of several years, she tracked  each one down, and she kicked their asses.
After her assault, she was in a girl  gang that was for the protection of females in the neighborhood  (initiation rites included piercing your ears with a knife). A few years  later, at the age of 13, she was briefly married to a 17-year-old in an  arranged partnership. After their divorce she moved to Los Angeles, got  a fake ID and worked as a blues singer and nude model. At age 15 she  began her career as a burlesque dancer in Calumet City, Illinois.
Satana dated Elvis in the 1950s – a relationship that was kept quiet  for obvious reasons. He copied some of her dance moves, and even  asked her to marry him, but she told him “No.”
Her first film role was in 1963’s Irma la Douce.  She then appeared in episodes of Burke’s Law and The Man From  U.N.C.L.E. The part she’s most recognized for came in 1965’s Faster, Pussycat!  Kill! Kill! in which   she plays Varla – the thrill-seeking, vicious, and deadly leader of a  girl gang of go-go dancers.
Kicking Ass and Taking Names: An Actress Spotlight on Tura Satana | Bitch Media

OH HER!  Yes, I noticed her in Irma La Douce.  I notice all the Orientals in old Hollywood films and wonder.  Thanks for posting

curate:

“You can still be feminine and have balls.” – Tura Satana

She was born in Hokkaidō, Japan in 1935 to a silent movie actor and a contortionist who performed with the circus. She’s of Japanese, Filipino, Scotch-Irish, and American Indian heritage. Her family spent time at the Manzanar Relocation Camp in Southern California before they were relocated to Chicago during World War II. Satana grew up on the Westside, in what she calls “The Mafia Section of town.”

Hers was the only Asian family in the neighborhood. As a result, she suffered daily harassment from other schoolchildren that forced her to continually have to fight her way to and from school. She also blossomed early – by age nine she was wearing a size 34C bra – a matter that made grade school life even worse.

At the age of nine, Satana was assaulted and raped by five men. They were caught and arrested, but never prosecuted. It was rumored that the judge had been paid off with a $1,000 bribe. She was sent off to reform school for “enticing” them – the victim had been blamed.

Her father taught her self-defense and she went on to earn a green belt in aikido and a black belt in karate. In Jimmy McDonough’s Big Bosoms and Square Jaws: The Biography of Russ Meyer, King of the Sex Film, Satana says, “If I could help every woman this has happened to, I would. It is in your spirit to conquer this degradation.”

Satana made a vow to herself that she would get even with each and every one of her attackers. Over the course of several years, she tracked each one down, and she kicked their asses.

After her assault, she was in a girl gang that was for the protection of females in the neighborhood (initiation rites included piercing your ears with a knife). A few years later, at the age of 13, she was briefly married to a 17-year-old in an arranged partnership. After their divorce she moved to Los Angeles, got a fake ID and worked as a blues singer and nude model. At age 15 she began her career as a burlesque dancer in Calumet City, Illinois.

Satana dated Elvis in the 1950s – a relationship that was kept quiet for obvious reasons. He copied some of her dance moves, and even asked her to marry him, but she told him “No.”

Her first film role was in 1963’s Irma la Douce. She then appeared in episodes of Burke’s Law and The Man From U.N.C.L.E. The part she’s most recognized for came in 1965’s Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! in which she plays Varla – the thrill-seeking, vicious, and deadly leader of a girl gang of go-go dancers.

Kicking Ass and Taking Names: An Actress Spotlight on Tura Satana | Bitch Media

OH HER!  Yes, I noticed her in Irma La Douce.  I notice all the Orientals in old Hollywood films and wonder.  Thanks for posting

February 3, 2011
Internment Chic?

ofanotherfashion:

Ryie Yoshizawa pictured here again in her dressmaking class in the Manzanar internment camp. (Ansel Adams 1944).

My rather extensive education in Asian American history (resulting in a PhD) never included the role of fashion and dressmaking in Japanese internment camps. These images (and several others that will be posted in the coming weeks) provide incredible insight into the relationships among fashion and war, Asian Americans and U.S. popular culture, and Asian American women’s popular culture and labor histories.

From the Library of Congress.

Some of Adams’ Manzanar photos strike me as very… posed.  Stagey.  Self-conscious.  Especially the group ones—maybe guards were supervising?

(via mytongueisforked)

January 25, 2011
fuckyeahapihistory:

Girls’ baseball team at Manzanar. July 17, 1942
Japanese-American prisoners made Manzanar more livable through recreation. They participated in sports, including baseball, football, and martial arts. Maye Noma, behind the plate, and Tomi Nagao, at bat, are pictured during a practice game between members of the Chick-a-dee softball team. The entire team was transplanted from Los Angeles to the War Relocation Authority Center at Manzanar.

Bet they would have whipped the Rockford Peaches.  Maybe not Tomi-chan.

fuckyeahapihistory:

Girls’ baseball team at Manzanar. July 17, 1942

Japanese-American prisoners made Manzanar more livable through recreation. They participated in sports, including baseball, football, and martial arts. Maye Noma, behind the plate, and Tomi Nagao, at bat, are pictured during a practice game between members of the Chick-a-dee softball team. The entire team was transplanted from Los Angeles to the War Relocation Authority Center at Manzanar.

Bet they would have whipped the Rockford Peaches.  Maybe not Tomi-chan.

January 23, 2011
Manzanar Internee, Ralph Lazo—Ally, Student Activist, Patriot

There was a young man at Manzanar who was NOT Japanese:

… first semester senior class officer Ralph Lazo. Not a Japanese name, not a Japanese face. To quote some of the new supplementary material in the back of Our World, after stowing away on the internment train, “Ralph […] went with his buddies from Belmont HS in Los Angeles to Manzanar. […] the only Mexican-Irish American to voluntarily place himself in camp out of loyalties to his buddies.” Fellow Manzanar senior William Hohri eulogized Lazo at the 50th class reunion saying: “When 140 million Americans turned their backs on us and excluded us into remote, desolate prison camps, the separation was absolute—almost. Ralph Lazo’s presence among us said, No, not everyone.” 

[Source: The ALAN Review]

January 23, 2011
Smile! High School Yearbook Photos

(Please click on my tumblrpage to properly view the photos)

Check it out.  In order to create a semblance of normalcy a 1943/1944 yearbook, Our World, was published for the  teens and young adults (university students) at Manzanar. 

One thing you begin to notice is that almost all of the group shots are taken outside, with the snow-capped Sierras in the background. It would not do to show the temporary, knocked together buildings—and no shots of guards, guns, or barbed wire were allowed—but guards, guns, and barbed wire were part of the Manzanar experience.

From the “Dedication:”

From a dusty wasteland to a lively community, Manzanar had progressed to become an exciting chapter, developing from World War II. This part of the story depicts the temporary wartime life of 10,000 tireless, self-sacrificing residents living in one square mile of barracks… .

From the “Forward”

Since that first day when Manzanar High School was called in session, the students and faculty have been trying to approximate in all activities the life we knew “back home.” With the publication of this yearbook, we feel that we have really come closer to our goal … . In years to come, when people will ask with real curiosity “What was Manzanar?” we can show them this volume… .

[Source: The Alan Review]

January 23, 2011
"Never Again: Manzanar"

A short documentary by acclaimed filmmaker, Ken Burns, can be viewed here. It runs about 13 minutes.

Note: At 12:22 there are yellow signs with black lettering held by people.  They are internees or relatives of internees and the names are the  concentration camps where they were jailed housed like stray dogs.

There is debate among Nikkei whether “concentration camp” should be replaced for the euphemistic “war relocation center” and “internment camp”.

The Manzanar Committee’s logo: 

It is a barb from a barbed wire fence superimposed on the Japanese flag “hinomaru” ( sun disc).

January 22, 2011
More Images of Manzanar by Ansel Adams

     

January 22, 2011
tigersmilk:

1943- This Japanese internment camp in California, called the Manzanar Relocation Center, was photographed by Ansel Adams.

Ansel Adams and Japanese-American photographer Toyo Miyatake published a book together, Two Views of Manzanar. Miyatake immigrated to the U.S. when he was 13.  He was an award winning photographer when he was interned at Manzanar.  He snuck in a camera lens and fashioned his own camera box to secretly photograph life there.  His studio is still in operation, run by his grandson.  Portrait of Miyatake by Ansel Adams:
  

tigersmilk:

1943- This Japanese internment camp in California, called the Manzanar Relocation Center, was photographed by Ansel Adams.

Ansel Adams and Japanese-American photographer Toyo Miyatake published a book together, Two Views of Manzanar. Miyatake immigrated to the U.S. when he was 13.  He was an award winning photographer when he was interned at Manzanar.  He snuck in a camera lens and fashioned his own camera box to secretly photograph life there.  His studio is still in operation, run by his grandson.  Portrait of Miyatake by Ansel Adams:

  

(via )

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