January 2, 2014
vintageblackglamour:

Juanita Moore, the Academy Award nominated actress best known for her role as the brokenhearted mother of a mixed daughter who wanted to pass as white in the 1959 film, “Imitation of Life,” died in Los Angeles on January 1, 2014 at the age of 99. A Los Angeles native, she was born there on October 19, 1914 (or 1922 - there are conflicting dates) and studied drama at Los Angeles City College before embarking on a singing career that took her to nightclubs in New York and Moulin Rouge in Paris. As a member of Ebony Showcase, a Los Angeles theater group, she had her first break as an actress in a controversial play at the time called “No Exit” wich was about three people who were presumed to be dead. Prior to becoming only the the fifth black performer to be nominated for an Academy Award, she appeared several films including “Pinky” in 1949 and “Affair in Trinidad” with Rita Hayworth in 1952. During a press tour for Imitation of Life in March 1959, Ms. Moore told Hazel Garland of the Pittsburgh Courier that she had to gain 18 pounds in order to appear more matronly for her role in the film. She said it took less than four wees to gain the weight, but more than two months to lose it. “To me, this is the break every actress dreams of getting. It is one in which I can run the gamut of emotions.” By 1967, she was far less enthusiastic in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “The Oscar prestige was fine, but I worked more before I was nominated,” Moore said at the time. “Casting directors think an Oscar nominee is suddenly in another category. They couldn’t possibly ask you to do one or two days’ work. You wouldn’t accept it. And I’m sure I would.” In this photo, Ms. Moore (seated) is shown on the set of “Imitation of Life” with the legendary gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, who famously sang at the funeral of Ms. Moore’s character Annie Johnson at the end of the film, and Ross Hunter, the producer of the film who cast her in her most famous role. Mr. Hunter and director Douglas Sirk considered over 40 black actresses for the role, including Pearl Bailey and Marian Anderson. Mr. Hunter told interviewers in March 1959, “When we interviewed Miss Moore, we knew our search was over. Even if she hadn’t been an experienced performer, her sincerity, warmth, and natural qualities would have won the role.” Once married to Nyas Berry, of the famed tap dancing Berry Brothers, Ms. Moore was married for over 50 years to Charles Burris, who died in 2001. Photo: A Certain Cinema/Sérgio Leemann.

vintageblackglamour:

Juanita Moore, the Academy Award nominated actress best known for her role as the brokenhearted mother of a mixed daughter who wanted to pass as white in the 1959 film, “Imitation of Life,” died in Los Angeles on January 1, 2014 at the age of 99. A Los Angeles native, she was born there on October 19, 1914 (or 1922 - there are conflicting dates) and studied drama at Los Angeles City College before embarking on a singing career that took her to nightclubs in New York and Moulin Rouge in Paris. As a member of Ebony Showcase, a Los Angeles theater group, she had her first break as an actress in a controversial play at the time called “No Exit” wich was about three people who were presumed to be dead. Prior to becoming only the the fifth black performer to be nominated for an Academy Award, she appeared several films including “Pinky” in 1949 and “Affair in Trinidad” with Rita Hayworth in 1952. During a press tour for Imitation of Life in March 1959, Ms. Moore told Hazel Garland of the Pittsburgh Courier that she had to gain 18 pounds in order to appear more matronly for her role in the film. She said it took less than four wees to gain the weight, but more than two months to lose it. “To me, this is the break every actress dreams of getting. It is one in which I can run the gamut of emotions.” By 1967, she was far less enthusiastic in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “The Oscar prestige was fine, but I worked more before I was nominated,” Moore said at the time. “Casting directors think an Oscar nominee is suddenly in another category. They couldn’t possibly ask you to do one or two days’ work. You wouldn’t accept it. And I’m sure I would.” In this photo, Ms. Moore (seated) is shown on the set of “Imitation of Life” with the legendary gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, who famously sang at the funeral of Ms. Moore’s character Annie Johnson at the end of the film, and Ross Hunter, the producer of the film who cast her in her most famous role. Mr. Hunter and director Douglas Sirk considered over 40 black actresses for the role, including Pearl Bailey and Marian Anderson. Mr. Hunter told interviewers in March 1959, “When we interviewed Miss Moore, we knew our search was over. Even if she hadn’t been an experienced performer, her sincerity, warmth, and natural qualities would have won the role.” Once married to Nyas Berry, of the famed tap dancing Berry Brothers, Ms. Moore was married for over 50 years to Charles Burris, who died in 2001. Photo: A Certain Cinema/Sérgio Leemann.

(via glossylalia)

December 10, 2013
vintageblackglamour:

Dr. Ralph Bunche (far right) with some of his friends at Harvard University, circa 1930. Dr. Bunche (1904-1971) was born in Detroit but raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Los Angeles, where he was valedictorian and graduated summa cum laude from UCLA. He earned a master’s degree in political science from Harvard in 1932 and taught at Howard University as he earned his doctorate from Harvard. Dr. Bunche played a critical role in the founding of the United Nations even as he maintained his duties as chair of the Political Science department at Howard, a position he held from 1928 to 1950. As Undersecretary General of the UN, his successful negotiation of four armistice agreements that ended the first Arab-Israeli war in 1949 led to him being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950. He was the first African-American - and the first person of color anywhere in the world - to be awarded the prize. Photo: Los Angeles Public Library

vintageblackglamour:

Dr. Ralph Bunche (far right) with some of his friends at Harvard University, circa 1930. Dr. Bunche (1904-1971) was born in Detroit but raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Los Angeles, where he was valedictorian and graduated summa cum laude from UCLA. He earned a master’s degree in political science from Harvard in 1932 and taught at Howard University as he earned his doctorate from Harvard. Dr. Bunche played a critical role in the founding of the United Nations even as he maintained his duties as chair of the Political Science department at Howard, a position he held from 1928 to 1950. As Undersecretary General of the UN, his successful negotiation of four armistice agreements that ended the first Arab-Israeli war in 1949 led to him being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950. He was the first African-American - and the first person of color anywhere in the world - to be awarded the prize. Photo: Los Angeles Public Library

December 10, 2013
diasporicroots:

collectivehistory:
Madam C.J. Walker and several friends in her automobile. 
She was the first woman in America to become a millionaire by her own endeavors, as well as the first African American millionaire. 

diasporicroots:

collectivehistory:

Madam C.J. Walker and several friends in her automobile.

She was the first woman in America to become a millionaire by her own endeavors, as well as the first African American millionaire. 

November 28, 2013

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

African-American Midwives

.

(via bananaleaves)

October 31, 2013
blackhistoryalbum:

IT’S A FAMILY AFFAIR | THE BLACK VICTORIANSProud Black Man & His Daughter, 1890s
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blackhistoryalbum:

IT’S A FAMILY AFFAIR | THE BLACK VICTORIANS

Proud Black Man & His Daughter, 1890s

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(Source: pinterest.com, via superkintaro)

February 10, 2013
thepittsburghhistoryjournal:

Two girls with former slave Sabre “Mother” Washington, Pittsburgh, early 1950s. Teenie Harris. [Carnegie Museum of Art] 
One of the girls, a neighbor of Washington’s, discovered the photograph years later. Washington, who grew up in South Carolina before moving to Pittsburgh, passed away in 1960 at the age of 113.

thepittsburghhistoryjournal:

Two girls with former slave Sabre “Mother” Washington, Pittsburgh, early 1950s. Teenie Harris. [Carnegie Museum of Art

One of the girls, a neighbor of Washington’s, discovered the photograph years later. Washington, who grew up in South Carolina before moving to Pittsburgh, passed away in 1960 at the age of 113.

(via immigrantstories)

February 9, 2013
barbaricman:

In 1930, he applied to the University of Maryland Law School, but was denied admission because he was Black.
After amassing an impressive record of Supreme Court challenges to state-sponsored discrimination, including the landmark Brown v. Board decision in 1954, President John F. Kennedy appointed Thurgood Marshall to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

barbaricman:

In 1930, he applied to the University of Maryland Law School, but was denied admission because he was Black.

After amassing an impressive record of Supreme Court challenges to state-sponsored discrimination, including the landmark Brown v. Board decision in 1954, President John F. Kennedy appointed Thurgood Marshall to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

(via loveandchunkybits-deactivated20)

December 29, 2012
Carmen Jones (Dorothy Dandridge) and her soldier, Joe (Harry Belafonte).

Carmen Jones (Dorothy Dandridge) and her soldier, Joe (Harry Belafonte).

(Source: neoafrican, via abagond)

December 2, 2012

fuckyeahbillieholiday:

Billie Holiday photographed by Maya Millett in 1958 (courtesy Ebony Magazine)

(Source: billiesholiday, via classicalallure)

November 16, 2012
vintageblackglamour:

Denise Nicholas as school counselor Liz McIntyre from the groundbreaking television show, “Room 222” in September 1969. Ms. Nicholas also starred in - and wrote for - the drama, “In the Heat of the Night” in the 1980s and was once married to the singer-songwriter, Bill Withers. In 2005, she released her debut novel “Freshwater Road,” which was loosely based on her own life. The novel follows a young Michigan woman’s journey south as a volunteer during 1964’s “Freedom Summer.”  Photo by ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images. 

Old enough to remember this show.  She was bee-yoo-ti-ful.

vintageblackglamour:

Denise Nicholas as school counselor Liz McIntyre from the groundbreaking television show, “Room 222” in September 1969. Ms. Nicholas also starred in - and wrote for - the drama, “In the Heat of the Night” in the 1980s and was once married to the singer-songwriter, Bill Withers. In 2005, she released her debut novel “Freshwater Road,” which was loosely based on her own life. The novel follows a young Michigan woman’s journey south as a volunteer during 1964’s “Freedom Summer.”  Photo by ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images. 

Old enough to remember this show.  She was bee-yoo-ti-ful.

October 11, 2012
A great piece about James Edwards and his work.
Patton (1970 dir. F. Schaffner) was Edwards’ last film.  Sadly he passed before its release.  George C. Scott (in)famously turned down his Oscar award for portraying General Patton, but did state,  "Maybe I’ll accept the Oscar in James Edwards’ name.  He deserved the Oscar 20 years ago and Sidney Poitier knows it.”

A great piece about James Edwards and his work.

Patton (1970 dir. F. Schaffner) was Edwards’ last film.  Sadly he passed before its release.  George C. Scott (in)famously turned down his Oscar award for portraying General Patton, but did state,  "Maybe I’ll accept the Oscar in James Edwards’ name.  He deserved the Oscar 20 years ago and Sidney Poitier knows it.”

October 3, 2012
Balloons filled with bleach target Asian and black students

(Source: daubentonian, via glossylalia)

September 30, 2012
collective-history:

Martin Luther King Jr removing a burned cross from his front yard with his son at his side. Atlanta Ga 1960.

collective-history:

Martin Luther King Jr removing a burned cross from his front yard with his son at his side. Atlanta Ga 1960.

(via diasporicroots)

April 8, 2012
vintageblackglamour:

Marian Anderson, singing during an Easter Sunday concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on April 9, 1939. The concert was broadcast on the radio across the nation and the integrated audience of 75,000 including members of the Supreme Court, Congress, and President Roosevelt’s cabinet. The concert was organized after the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to allow Ms. Anderson to sing to an integrated audience at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. solely because of her race. Photo via The Library of Congress.

vintageblackglamour:

Marian Anderson, singing during an Easter Sunday concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on April 9, 1939. The concert was broadcast on the radio across the nation and the integrated audience of 75,000 including members of the Supreme Court, Congress, and President Roosevelt’s cabinet. The concert was organized after the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to allow Ms. Anderson to sing to an integrated audience at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C. solely because of her race. Photo via The Library of Congress.

(via so-treu)

February 1, 2012
vintageblackglamour:

Howard University students photographed in their dorm by LIFE magazine’s Alfred Eisenstaedt for a November 1946 photo essay. See other Howard students here.

vintageblackglamour:

Howard University students photographed in their dorm by LIFE magazine’s Alfred Eisenstaedt for a November 1946 photo essay. See other Howard students here.


(via glossylalia)

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