October 21, 2013
"I’ve experienced firsthand how the “model minority” narrative– this strange tendency to assume that Asians are simply a quiet, high-achieving community tagging along with our white brethren into a melting pot of joy–effectively de-legitimizes our voices in conversations about promoting racial justice. Leaving our voices and experiences out of the fight for racial justice erases our long, often tragic history in this country and homogenizes all Asians into one, high-achieving blob. Leaving us out means turning a blind eye to the fact that 1 in 6 Filipino-Americans and 1 in 4 Korean-Americans are undocumented, that Southeast Asians have the highest high school dropout rates in the country, that Asian American students are the most bullied ethnic group in classrooms, and that Asian women are consistently hypersexualized, objectified, and orientalized via widespread media representations. If you choose not to include us in discussions on racial justice, you are telling us that our struggles don’t matter."

— Linsey Yoo, Racialicious, "Solidarity is for white women and Asian people are funny" (via blackinasia)

(Source: owning-my-truth, via cannelledusoleil)

March 5, 2013
U.S. Senate Confirms First Gay Asian-American Woman to Federal Bench

holygoddamnshitballs:

In a voice vote, the Senate today confirmed Pamela Ki Mai Chen, a Brooklyn prosecutor, to the federal bench for a seat on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York. Chen is the first openly gay Asian American on the federal bench.

The Legal Times reports.

ChenChen is currently the chief of the civil rights section in the U.S. attorney’s office for the Eastern District of New York, where she prosecutes and supervises cases involving hate crimes, color of law violations and human trafficking cases. The New York Chapter of the National Asian Pacific Islander Prosecutors Association lists her as a board member. Chen’s parents were immigrants from China, Schumer said.

The Washington Blade adds:

Sen. Chuck Schumer, who recommended the nomination to Obama, praised the Senate for confirming Chen in a statement and said her background will serve her well on the federal bench.

“Ms. Chen’s wealth of experience and devotion to public service make it clear that she will be an excellent judge,” Schumer said. “Ms. Chen has proven time and again that she is a leader and a pioneer in the legal field. I have every confidence that she will serve her jurisdiction well.”

Said Obama at the time of Chen’s nomination: “I am proud to nominate this outstanding candidate to serve on the United States District Court bench. Pamela Chen has a long and distinguished record of service, and I am confident she will serve on the federal bench with distinction.”


via Towleroad

(via titotito)

January 31, 2013
For Asian-Americans, Immigration Backlogs Are A Major Hurdle [NPR]

Although the national conversation about immigration policy tends to focus on Latinos, it is Asian-Americans who encounter some of the knottiest challenges facing immigrants and immigration reformers.

Of the five countries with the longest backlogs for visas, four are in Asia.

According to a report from the National Asian American Survey released earlier this week, Asian-Americans boast the highest proportion of foreign-born United States residents of any group — about 3 in 4 Asian-American adults were born outside the country — and Asia now accounts for the largest share of immigration to the U.S. What’s more: There are an estimated 1.3 million unauthorized Asian immigrants in the U.S.

If you’re trying to get a visa to legally enter the United States from an Asian country, you could be waiting for a very long time.

6:15pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Ztg1Ayd5_lsZ
(View comments  
Filed under: AAPI immigration 
January 30, 2013
18mr:

Today is Fred Korematsu Day.
FRED KOREMATSU (1/30/1919-3/20/2005) was a Japanese-American who resisted internment during World War II. The ACLU picked up his case as a way to challenge the legality of internment; Korematsu was charged and convicted of violating military orders. Not until much later in his life was Korematsu’s name cleared and his cause vindicated. After uncovering new evidence that reports from the FBI saying Japanese-Americans posed no threat had been suppressed, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned. In 1998, President Bill Clinton awarded him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, saying “In the long history of our country’s constant search for justice, some names of ordinary citizens stand for millions of souls. Plessy, Brown, Parks…to that distinguished list, today we add the name of Fred Korematsu.”
Late in life, Korematsu also spoke out against the U.S. government’s practices at Guantanamo Bay and other sites, saying that if we learn anything from his story, it should be that imprisoning people without charge merely because they “look” like an enemy, and helped write amicus curiae briefs filed in cases against the federal government on behalf of U.S. citizens held at Guantanamo.

18mr:

Today is Fred Korematsu Day.

FRED KOREMATSU (1/30/1919-3/20/2005) was a Japanese-American who resisted internment during World War II. The ACLU picked up his case as a way to challenge the legality of internment; Korematsu was charged and convicted of violating military orders.

Not until much later in his life was Korematsu’s name cleared and his cause vindicated. After uncovering new evidence that reports from the FBI saying Japanese-Americans posed no threat had been suppressed, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned.

In 1998, President Bill Clinton awarded him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, saying “In the long history of our country’s constant search for justice, some names of ordinary citizens stand for millions of souls. Plessy, Brown, Parks…to that distinguished list, today we add the name of Fred Korematsu.”

Late in life, Korematsu also spoke out against the U.S. government’s practices at Guantanamo Bay and other sites, saying that if we learn anything from his story, it should be that imprisoning people without charge merely because they “look” like an enemy, and helped write amicus curiae briefs filed in cases against the federal government on behalf of U.S. citizens held at Guantanamo.

(via reallifedocumentarian)

January 19, 2013
Where Do Asian Americans Stand on Immigration Reform? [HuffPo]

Just like Latinos, Asian Americans have family members, friends and neighbors who are without papers. It is estimated that 11 percent of all unauthorized people in the United States are Asians. Moreover, a majority of Asians are first-generation immigrants who are greatly affected by the inadequacies of our immigration system. Asian immigrants are among those who wait the longest — up to two decades — to be reunited with their loved ones because of immigration backlogs. Highly educated and skilled Asian immigrants can wait up to six years before earning green cards. Immigration is an Asian issue.

November 2, 2012
"First and second generation Asian Americans, both female and male, often feel an extra burden of meeting their family’s expectations of the American dream and are caught in these transitional cultural norms. Given their parents’ sacrifices to emigrate to the United States, first-generation American born teenagers often feel a greater burden to meet their family’s expectations. They also feel a greater responsibility and guilt if they are unable to live up to these demands. They are in the difficult position of having to maintain the mother culture AND assimilate into American culture. When these familial and cultural expectations clash, the transitional generation faces the difficult task of finding a comfortable way of integrating conflicting values."

Connie S Chan, “Asian American Women and Adolescent Girls: Sexuality and Sexual Expression.” 

It’s so weird finding a paragraph in your reading that essentially captures your entire adolescence. 

(via thatisnotfeminism)

(Source: , via fascinasians)

October 28, 2012
Easy Tiger (Nation) [Jeff Yang/WSJ blog]

But any use of the term “Asian” should recognize that its meaningful existence is less than half a century old, and the identity it refers to is very much in beta — and working out the compatibility issues that come with a rapidly growing and wildly varied installed base.

Which means that there are many individuals of Asian descent in America who, if congratulated on the success of the “Asian community,” will simply look blank. Not all Asians think alike. Not all Asians think they’re “Asian.” And not all Asians share the same values, the same opportunities and obstacles — or the same socioeconomic outcomes.

The communities that sit under the Asian umbrella comprise over two dozen ethnicities speaking over a hundred languages and dialects, with each population arriving in the U.S. at different times and under unique circumstances. It shouldn’t be surprising, then, that Asian Americans have the widest income spread of any demographic group: Indian Americans have the highest per-capita income of any ethnic group in the U.S., at around $38,000; Hmong, the lowest, at around $11,000, with a full 27 percent living beneath the federal poverty line.

Yet the flattening effect of means and medians erases these distinctions, encouraging the trumpeting of the triumph of “Asians” in broad, paint-roller strokes. It’s a major reason why the Pew Research Center’s large, important and widely cited study of the Asian American population, titled “The Rise of Asian Americans,” has generated such consternation among advocacy and service organizations.

While the data the Pew report offers is valuable, the sensationalist and nuance-free manner in which it has been promoted to the media has produced an avalanche of stories about how the Asian American community, powered by its work ethic, family values, prodigious overachievement, et cetera, serves as a blueprint for how other groups can eliminate need and attain success (overlooking the fact that the “rise” of Latin, Caribbean and African immigrants is easily as laudable as that of Asians).

October 28, 2012
bait-thoughts:



Yuri Kochiyama is a Japanese American human rights activist, but often remembered for her work in The Black Panther Party.In 1960, Kochiyama and her spouse moved to Harlem in New York City and joined the Harlem Parents Committee. She became acquainted with Malcolm X and was a member of his Organization of Afro-American Unity. She was also present at Malcolm X’s assassination on February 21, 1965, at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem, and held him in her arms as he lay dying.In 1977, Kochiyama joined the group of Puerto Ricans that took over the Statue of Liberty to draw attention to the struggle for Puerto Rican independence.Over the years, Kochiyama has dedicated herself to various causes, such as the rights of political prisoners, freeing Mumia Abu-Jamal, nuclear disarmament, and reparations to Japanese Americans who were interned during the war.In 2005, Kochiyama was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize through the “1,000 Women for the Nobel Peace Prize 2005” project.

Source

bait-thoughts:

Yuri Kochiyama is a Japanese American human rights activist, but often remembered for her work in The Black Panther Party.

In 1960, Kochiyama and her spouse moved to Harlem in New York City and joined the Harlem Parents Committee. She became acquainted with Malcolm X and was a member of his Organization of Afro-American Unity. She was also present at Malcolm X’s assassination on February 21, 1965, at the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem, and held him in her arms as he lay dying.

In 1977, Kochiyama joined the group of Puerto Ricans that took over the Statue of Liberty to draw attention to the struggle for Puerto Rican independence.

Over the years, Kochiyama has dedicated herself to various causes, such as the rights of political prisoners, freeing Mumia Abu-Jamal, nuclear disarmament, and reparations to Japanese Americans who were interned during the war.

In 2005, Kochiyama was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize through the “1,000 Women for the Nobel Peace Prize 2005” project.

(via downlo)

October 25, 2012
screengoddess:

Anna May Wong 1934

screengoddess:

Anna May Wong 1934

(via neroon)

October 24, 2012
deadlinecom:

Ming Na, who knows her way around a sci-fi (or medical) franchise, is now the second actor cast in Joss Whedon’s “S.H.I.E.L.D” TV adaptation of Marvel’s Avengers franchise, Deadline’s Nellie Andreeva reports. 
Read more about the news, which is sure to gladden the hearts of at least some Avengers fans, here: http://www.deadline.com/2012/10/ming-na-marvels-shield-casting-joss-whedon-abc-pilot/
What do you think of the casting? Someone you’d like to see on the show? 

deadlinecom:

Ming Na, who knows her way around a sci-fi (or medical) franchise, is now the second actor cast in Joss Whedon’s “S.H.I.E.L.D” TV adaptation of Marvel’s Avengers franchise, Deadline’s Nellie Andreeva reports. 

Read more about the news, which is sure to gladden the hearts of at least some Avengers fans, here: http://www.deadline.com/2012/10/ming-na-marvels-shield-casting-joss-whedon-abc-pilot/

What do you think of the casting? Someone you’d like to see on the show? 

(via cijithgeek-deactivated20121104)

October 21, 2012
Did you know that the idea of birthright citizenship in the U.S. was solidified by United States v. Wong Kim Ark?

voguedissent:

I’m always stunned by what fails to make the history books as important information that everyone should know. Props to Wikipedia for making it today’s featured article.

I wonder where the futures of the Latino and Asian/Asian-American communities lie. Asian/Asian-Americans are still treated as perpetual foreigners despite our long history in America, and the U.S. has tried many times to boot us out…much as they are trying with the Latino community now. (United States v. Wong Kim Ark is under fresh scrutiny due to current politics.) I read somewhere that prior to the 1960s, Latinos were stereotyped as the model minority while Asian/Asian-Americans were stereotyped as the poor, grubby laundryworkers and manual laborers. It’s funny how these threads intertwine…

(via fascinasians)

October 11, 2012
guest post by carmina ocampo: top five myths about asian americans and affirmative action [Angry Asian Man]

September 27, 2012
Racist bullshit from San Francisco?

losertakesall:

justliketheprinciplesoffeminism:

I live in a really small, supra-majority white town where you might expect racist bullshit to be the norm, but I was pretty shocked to hear that up until this month, San Francisco’s police department labeled the arrests they made as white, black, Chinese, or other. SERIOUSLY? Sorry I expected more of you, West Coast.

Up until this month, nearly all Asians were classified as “Chinese” in the San Francisco Police Department’s outdated data entry system because the department only had four choices for noting the race of a person arrested: either white, black, other, or Chinese. After complaints from community leaders, the Bay Citizen reports that police officers started identifying people who are arrested using 18 ethnic categories from the California Department of Justice according to how people who are arrested identify. One local activist told the Bay Citizen that the incorrect data has likely led to a misallocation of city funds to fight crime by making the number of crimes committed by the Chinese American community appear higher, and it is unclear what will happen to the decades of incorrect data.

whoa! great job there, SF…

(Source: thinkprogress.org, via electrodaggers)

May 30, 2012
Gordon Kiyoshi Hirabayashi (平林潔), 2012 recipient of the Medal of Freedom. The medal was awarded posthumously Tuesday, May 29, five months after Hirabayashi’s passing.
In a remarkable show of personal courage, Auburn native Gordon Hirabayashi was one of handful of Japanese Americans nationwide to defy U.S. government curfew and “evacuation” orders issued in 1942 (in the context of World War II) to persons of Japanese ancestry who lived on the West Coast. Hirabayashi considered the orders to be a gross violation of Constitutional rights. He was arrested, convicted, and imprisoned, and eventually appealed his case to the U.S. Supreme Court. Although the Supreme Court upheld his conviction at the time, the fight to overturn it resumed in the 1980s, culminating in his judicial vindication. After the war, Gordon Hirabayashi became a sociologist. He spent most of his career teaching at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton, Canada. He died on January 2, 2012. [historylink.org]

Gordon Kiyoshi Hirabayashi (平林潔), 2012 recipient of the Medal of Freedom. The medal was awarded posthumously Tuesday, May 29, five months after Hirabayashi’s passing.

In a remarkable show of personal courage, Auburn native Gordon Hirabayashi was one of handful of Japanese Americans nationwide to defy U.S. government curfew and “evacuation” orders issued in 1942 (in the context of World War II) to persons of Japanese ancestry who lived on the West Coast. Hirabayashi considered the orders to be a gross violation of Constitutional rights. He was arrested, convicted, and imprisoned, and eventually appealed his case to the U.S. Supreme Court. Although the Supreme Court upheld his conviction at the time, the fight to overturn it resumed in the 1980s, culminating in his judicial vindication. After the war, Gordon Hirabayashi became a sociologist. He spent most of his career teaching at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton, Canada. He died on January 2, 2012. [historylink.org]

April 8, 2012
Toshia Morie (far left) in her 1932 WAMPAS Baby Stars group photo. Ginger Rogers and Gloria Start were also nominated that year.

Toshia Morie (far left) in her 1932 WAMPAS Baby Stars group photo. Ginger Rogers and Gloria Start were also nominated that year.

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